Awesome photography from great pinholistas

Balint Pfliegel

Hi Pinholista, please introduce yourself.

My name is Bálint Pfliegel, I’m from Budapest, Hungary, a software engineer and DSP/AI researcher by profession. I picked up photography and 3d printing in the last years and enjoying very much to create 3d printed pinhole/slit/etc cameras and photographic equipment – and images.

Tell us a little about the type of pinhole photography you enjoy.

Content is what matters, pinhole should contribute as a method to express what’s on one’s mind visually. Also, it’s a lot of fun that the subject demands a camera design and not the camera limits on how one could capture a specific subject.

I’m very much enjoying the work of pinholers that capture real life like Andrej Karamuska or Denys Maksymov – or artistically expressed emotions and moods like Michael Weitzman, Nadir Kayacan or Martin Kos. I am struggling to get the precision of my engineer-self out of the pictures with its love of geometry and precision, and focus on the content instead.

Pinhole for me is analog and B/W for the time being, before extending my lab for C-41 and E-6 processing.

instax___portrait

Do you ever shoot anything a little more unusual?

Shooting swings and seesaws is wonderful! It is an exquisite moment when the police arrives at the seventeenth minute of the exposure in case you put your camera on a swing in the middle of a block of flats and tenderly rock the swing under the strict supervision of senior citizens peeping out of their window. Admin’s note, the same is true in the UK…folks don’t like photographs being made at playgrounds, I’ve been asked what I am doing when there were no kids around. I certainly wouldn’t take pictures of someone’s kids (unless they asked me too) but the camera does seem to inspire fear these days.

Seriously: I love any in-camera magic when the image plane is not flat or not perpendicular to the hole, multiholes, in-camera blends – and especially enjoying instant film cameras, it is a lot of fun at festivals.

fivehole___in_the_woods

Do you use off the shelf cameras, home-made or a mix?

So far I only used home-made ones.

What’s your favourite camera to use and why?

Didn’t try any so far, but RealitySoSubtle and MO cameras seem to rock hard! Not to mention Schlem’s arsenal of superweapons. Admin’s note, take a look at my camera guide for more ideas…but remember the camera is just a tool, your imagination is the arsenal.

How long have you shot pinhole?

For around a year.

Why did you start shooting pinhole and why?

I bought a 3d printer two years ago and found an article about 3d printed cameras. Not long thereafter I asked Todd Schlemmer if he plans to do a cylindrical anamorph someday, and he wrote about two fundamental design puzzles one needs to solve first. I wondered if I can crack them and it seemed I could. It was far from easy, but I enjoyed much the road leading there. Always the engineer! Admin’s note, given that the Schlem is an evil genius this is really impressive!

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I’ve curated a few of your images to share, please tell us a little about the cameras used to make these images.

There is a curved 4×5 format – yes, it is a curved 4×5 holder with a curved shield (and a camera body)! And there is a cylindrical anamorph, which was my first design – the selected images are taken with an early design with screws and a lot of leaking, but I like these images much. Then, there is a five-hole camera, which is based on a design of my friend Péter Laczkó, the travelling photographer, with several refinements. One of my other designs was originally a Lomo Belair Instax Wide back with a 3d printed adapter to accommodate a Kodak Pocket No1 folder from the 30s, but I ended up ripping out the Kodak and replacing the front part with a pinhole.

Do you shoot individual images or do you work within themes or on projects?

I’m still working on being more patient in order to shoot an essay using pinhole techniques. Just made a lightweight 35mm camera from a perfume box (my first non 3d printed one) which I’m carrying around lately to document my life – that prepares me to be more relaxed when working with pinhole in the future.

cyl_anamorph___hello_neighbours

I guess now is the time for me to tell everyone the reason for the images I’ve selected.

When Balint e-mailed a selection of images to possibly be used for his profile it gave me an opportunity I have not had before, which is to curate someone else’s work. I’m not a great curator of my own work so this really represented a new challenge for me. This is a good thing!

I was immediately struck by the technical quality of Balint’s work but these images I have selected go beyond that. For one, I think they hang together as an interesting narrative. There’s a thread of melancholy that runs through each, which I find really beguiling. This is kind of interesting as they are made with different cameras at different times. Nonetheless, I think there’s a story being told here. I’d love to know what you think, perhaps I’m seeing something that isn’t there, please comment below.

Have you ever exhibited your work?

Not yet, not much time currently. We did a slit camera from some enlarger components and bicycle parts in the summer with my friend Péter Laczkó, which will be exhibited from tomorrow! Admin’s note, early May 2016!

curved_4x5___i_m_just_a_lonely_boy_would_you_be_my_enemy

Tell us about a great pinhole photographer.

I could say Howard Arthur Moiser, Ramunas Danisevicius or Scott Speck, who are really legends when it comes to pinhole – but I will say: Balázs Telek. Balázs was the master of anamorphs, working with both pinholes and lenses and passing on his knowledge holding camera obscura workshops. He passed away last summer at the age of 41, tragically young. His lab, ArtBázis was flooded at the same time on a day with heavy rain – when we renovated the lab afterwards, we found cameras and designs that were really hard to decrypt – and shockingly genial. Balázs was an unselfish, wholehearted man with a unique talent and I don’t think I know any pinholers in Hungary who was not inspired by his person and work. There is a decent article about Balázs from two years ago (in Hungarian).

Do you shoot other styles of photography?

I like to shoot street, documentary and trash (if there is any such style) – depends on the mood.

Assuming you do shoot other styles, do you prefer pinhole and if so, why?

There are weapons that kill zombies, but not really useful against vampires. With pinhole this is a similar case, so it depends on what one is shooting. It would be interesting to shoot a documentary with pinhole similarly to Nick Dvoracek’s work.

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Finally, where can people see your work, do you have a website?

I plan to do a Facebook page of my works and maybe a website when I will have some spare time. As we are also setting up a camera manufacturing company right now with Péter that will produce unique pinhole and other experimental cameras, I am looking forward that people will hold our works in their hands and shoot wonderful images. Stay tuned!

Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your work with pinholista.com.

As usual, this work is the copyright of the contributing photography, in this case Balint. Please respect this. If you’d like to be featured on Pinholista please get in touch via the contact page.

Johanna Moore

Hi Pinholista, please introduce yourself.

My name is Johanna Moore. I have lived in many states in New England (US) and, while I have lived most of my life in Maine, I have spent some important times in Lancaster and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Tell us a little about the type of pinhole photography you enjoy.

When it comes to pinhole photography, I am an analogue purist. I use film and paper negatives. Holgas, Polaroid/Fujiroids. Altoid tin cameras. I have a Sharan cardboard camera that I use, as well as tin can cameras I have built. I love using Harman Direct Positive paper because of the slow speed of the paper. I use a foam core pinhole camera I built for some 8 x 10 film holders I found at an antique shop. With pinhole photography the possibilities are endless.

Do you ever shoot anything a little more unusual?

I recently completed a major project along the length of the Kennebec River in Maine where I installed 120 pinhole cameras for long exposure solargraphs.

Dresden Bridge

Dresden Bridge

Do you use off the shelf cameras, home-made or a mix?

I totally use a mix. Some people get excited about a new App they buy, I get excited about a new camera to build or buy. Admin’s note, yet another sufferer of Gear Acquisition Syndrome (G.A.S). It’s a terrible affliction that can strike even the most hard-hearted at the most unexpected time.

What’s your favourite camera to use and why?

I love using my Pinholaroid. I have to admit that I borrowed it from my sister and never gave it back. The body she made for it is more for close-ups, and I made some beautiful long exposure images of flowers with it. I am working on an interchangeable “lens” to do more wide angle shots with it because I find myself taking it with me into the field more often than I did in the past. It helps that I rigged up a wooden form that I can slip the camera into and have it screwed down to my tripod. Admin’s note, there is something really stunning about Pinholaroid images…I think it is the way the film reacts to longer exposure, tending towards a blue cast in my experience (which works perfectly with Johanna’s flower images).

Bergamot

Bergamot

How long have you shot pinhole?

I took my first pinhole images back in 1988. I had seen a body of work an acquaintance produced in Boston using SX-70 film and a pinhole camera. I produced a series of failed images with the first camera I built for the SX-70 film and then I gave up on Pinhole cameras for about 12 years.

Why did you start shooting pinhole and why?

In photography I am not interested in creating the perfect clear, in-focus, well-planned image that some photographers seek to achieve. I am interested in capturing moments of light, ethereal images, and something which allows the viewer to draw from their own personal experiences to make their own conclusions about what they are looking at. Pinhole photography gives me that opportunity to produce that imagery. I gave up on the medium in 1988, then, in 2000, after I used my sister’s Polaroid pinhole camera, I got hooked once again and have never looked back.

Greenpoint Ferns

Greenpoint Ferns

You’ve given us a few images to share, tell us about them.

Hewnoaks 2- When I embarked on my Kennebec River solargraph project in 2014, I left the success and failure of the 120 cameras up to chance. I had no idea if the project would work, or if any of the pinholes I made were accurate. It took two months to install the cameras along the river. I was accepted into an artist residency program on Kezar Lake in Lovell. I stayed there two weeks to work and took advantage of being there to test some of the cameras I built. This image is a two week exposure and was made using Oriental Seagull photo paper.

Bergamot- one of my early experiments with the Pinholaroid. I produced this series of botanicals indoors on bright overcast days. The exposure times were any where from 20 minutes to an hour. Admin’s note, I simply love this image, the tones are stunning…I must make another Pinholaroid.

Dresden Bridge- 134 day pinhole exposure along the Kennebec River.

Bog 2014- The first experiment I made using Solargraphy. Six week exposure

The Great Carrying Place- 129 day Solargraph. The Carrying Place is along the Kennebec River where Benedict Arnold and his soldiers left the river to carry their bateaux over the mountains during their march on Quebec during the American Revolutionary War. This portage site may be significant for the Europeans who used it for their own ill-conceived ideas. It is more significant to the Native Americans who used it for centuries before the arrival of the foreigners who would forever change their way of life.

Greenpoint Ferns- I also like using my 120 Holga pinhole camera. I first used a Holga that I retrofitted with a pinhole then upgraded to a ready-made pinhole from Holga. When I go into the field I often photograph favourite places. Greenpoint is a Maine Wildlife Management Area along the Kennebec River at Merrymeeting Bay. Even in the heat of summer I can go here to find respite in the cool shade among the ferns.

Do you shoot individual images or do you work within themes or on projects?

All of the above. While I may load a bunch of paper into my film holders and go out to shoot for a day, I won’t hesitate to work on a single idea based on a theme or project. The Kennebec River project is the perfect case in point. I experimented with Solargraphy in the beaver bog in my back yard, then expanded the experiment to an historic site in the neighbouring town. When I got some successful imagery from that, I ended up expanding the idea to the entire stretch of the Kennebec River. It was a moving experience. I explored places that I would never have seen had I not embarked on the project. I learned so much about a major force of nature in my own back yard.

Hewn Oaks 2

Hewnoaks 2

Have you ever exhibited your work?

I have exhibited my pinhole work through a Pop-up exhibit with Portland Pinhole and Plastic Camera group back in 2009 and then most recently I exhibited the body of solargraphs I produced along the Kennebec River through the Maine Museum of Photographic Arts in Portland.

Tell us about a great pinhole photographer.

In full disclosure this artist is my friend. That said, I love everything that Massachusetts photographer Dennis Stein produces. Pinhole and Digital.  Admin’s note, Dennis’ work is wonderful, although he seems to be focussing on iPhoneography at the moment (http://djsteinphotography.com/home/).

Do you shoot other styles of photography?

I use my iPhone to shoot everyday images and work I post on social media.

Bog

Bog

Assuming you do shoot other styles, do you prefer pinhole and if so, why?

I prefer pinhole photography because it is about time. Taking time, experiencing time. Looking at scenery and taking the time to examine what you are about to shoot. With digital you can take a zillion shots an edit later. That’s not the same with pinhole photography. Admin’s note, this is a philosophy close to my own. Although I do use digital (actually increasingly so) for my lens-based work there is something magical about the time it takes to make a pinhole image.

Finally, where can people see your work, do you have a website?

http://lonepineprojects.com/

Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your work with pinholista.com.

As usual, this work is the copyright of the contributing photography, in this case Johanna. Please respect this.

Diane Martin Peterson

Hi Pinholista, please introduce yourself.

My name is Diane Peterson, many of you know me by Diane Martin Peterson, especially on Facebook…it seems there are a lot of Diane Peterson’s out there. I am from the west coast of the United States and pretty much call Washington state my home. Right now I live in the upper central area of Idaho, out in the country 8 miles from  the end of the pavement.

Tell us a little about the type of pinhole photography you enjoy.

I love analog photography and I am strictly an analog pinhole photography shooter. I do know a few photographers out there who are doing digital pinhole and they do lovely work but everyone has to do what they are comfortable with and for me, film and  photo paper just works. Admin’s note, for some great digital pinhole photography please take a look at Timos Lytras‘ work…right here on Pinholista.com!

whitebirdparadepinhole
Do you ever shoot anything a little more unusual? 

My anamorphic images seem to follow me wherever I go! I love anamorphic images and how it makes the minds eye work a little harder to figure out just what you are  looking at!

Do you use off the shelf cameras, home-made or a mix?

I do have a vast collection of “off the shelf” pinhole cameras made by some extremely talented camera builders. But once I figured out how to make my own, I pretty much like to stick with those homebuilt models. Of course many of the anamorphic images I create are made using square or round tins. I am truly fascinated by the concept that anything that can be made light tight and have a piece of photo paper inserted , will become a camera in my house.

paradewhitebird

What’s your favourite camera to use and why?

It is somewhat funny that with all the cameras I have purchased or built, and there are a lot, I usually grab a little five inch tall round tea tin I purchased at a Chinese market. Perfect for 5 x 7 photo paper. The other most used “cameras” come from the dollar store where you can buy tins of cookies for a dollar, also perfect for 5 x 7 paper, double gratification, cookies & a camera for a buck! I use these for “solargraphs” also, as I make a lot of these and give them to people wanting to have a simple introduction to pinhole photography. Admin’s note, making cameras is such a wonderful aspect of pinhole photography. Sadly I don’t have the time to do it as much as I would like, but there is nothing as satisfying as seeing an image appear from something you have built yourself.

country parade

How long have you shot pinhole?

I first read about pinhole photography in the British Black & White Photography magazine in 2006. At the time I was just getting into photography but the idea of a light tight box, a brass shim and some photo paper fascinated me so I researched everything I could find on the subject.

Why did you start shooting pinhole and why?

Without any doubt the reason I started doing pinhole was the amazing results you can get by just using your imagination and being creative with your camera size.

You’ve given us a few images to share, tell us about them. 

As I am enchanted with using photo paper. I am sharing a few images here. Also a friend just gave me a Holga Wide pinhole camera and recently got around to shooting a roll of 120 black & white ( my favorite) film…I probably shoot about 98% of my images with paper. I love the slow intentional results that you can obtain  by loading one sheet of paper then developing it and seeing immediate results. When using film I am always eager (maybe too eager) for results so perhaps I don’t take as much time as I would with paper.

grandmotheranamorph

Do you shoot individual images or do you work within themes or on projects?

As it happens I live far enough away from the general population that I don’t have any “real” people to photograph so I decided a few years ago to make my own “people”.  Life size wooden mannequins that I can dress and arrange in scenes to suit my fancy. I started using masks on  my mannequins a couple years ago so I am working on a collection of images with vintage fairly tales or nursery rhymes as a theme.

Have you ever exhibited your work?

I have been exhibiting my work for at least six years. I have been lucky enough to  display my work in several galleries.

Tell us about a great pinhole photographer.

Wow! There are so many! I love the work of Walter Crump. The story of how he started shooting pinhole is great! He had all of his camera equipment stolen so he launched  his pinhole camera making career. I love his anamorphic images. Admin’s note, Walter makes wonderful work, you can see more on his website.

girlunderslip

Do you shoot other styles of photography?

Sometimes when I travel it is not convenient to carry around a metal tin and a box of photo paper so I use my Nikon F100 and also LC-A Wide..I very much enjoy toy cameras of all types so I try to bring at least one with me when I travel. I make my own lenses and filters so that I don’t get in a rut and also this separates my work from other photographers.

Assuming you do shoot other styles, do you prefer pinhole and if so, why?

I do prefer pinhole! Sometimes I think I should focus on other cameras in my collection but after a few shots I am right back at my pinhole work.

Finally, where can people see your work, do you have a website?

Yes,  find me in a couple places…

www.thepinholequeen.tumblr.com 

www.dianemartinpeterson.com

Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your work with pinholista.com

As usual, this work is the copyright of the contributing photography, in this case Diane. Please respect this.

Timos Lytras

Hi Pinholista, please introduce yourself.

Hello, I’m Timos and I live in Athens, Greece. I shoot pictures for more than three decades, and I still shoot a roll of film now and then, although the vast majority of my pictures are digital.

Tell us a little about the type of pinhole photography you enjoy.

I shoot pinhole images with the “Wanderlust pinwide” lens, attached to a m43 camera. I never happened to shoot pinhole in film. Admin’s note, it might just be me but this seems a little unusual. I know lots of pinhole photographers who have never shot digital pinhole but very few where this works the other way. Read on, as Timos was kind enough to answer a few extra questions about this.

Timos2

Do you ever shoot anything a little more unusual? 

The “Unusual” type of shooting I do is film photography with two lomography cameras, the “Sprocket Rocket”, a wide angle camera and the “Spinner 360”, a film camera that takes a 360 degree shot (including the photographer’s face). Admin’s note…thinks…360 degree pinhole…mmmm.

Do you use off the shelf cameras, home-made or a mix?

Unfortunately I don’t use any homemade camera, only off the shelf ones.

Timos3

What’s your favourite camera to use and why?

The Panasonic G6 that I use now. The m43 format is the perfect balance between size and quality for me and it allows also to try other creative points of view, such as the digital pinhole and the cctv lenses. Admin’s note, as an aside, I wonder if there are CCTV lenses available that are pinhole? This is for another project, of which there may be more some time in the future…anyway, back to Timos (but let me know if you know).

How long have you shot pinhole?

Since three years more or less.

Why did you start shooting pinhole?

I like the ethereal feel that a pinhole image gives. The result of a pinhole image is completely different than the images we are used to see everyday, it takes the eye away of the details and more into the overall mood of the image.

Timos4

You’ve given us a few images to share, tell us about them. 

I travel often and I like to capture with my camera everything new that I see, especially the feeling of a place that I haven’t seen before. These photos are from many different places, from Greece which is my home country to other European countries and even from the Middle East. Admin’s note, for me there’s a great thread that runs through these images which is the atmosphere. The darker tones work really well with the subject matter, this is a great set of images IMHO.

Timos5

Do you shoot individual images or do you work within themes or on projects?

I shoot individual images. My pinhole images are mostly landscapes (even urban ones) but I have tried some street photography, too. My digital camera allows normal speeds when using high iso, if there is enough light, of course. Admin’s note, I’ve often wondered about the ISO advantage. It could be really useful on the one hand, but you would lose the long exposure. I guess its all about the result you want.

Have you ever exhibited your work?

Unfortunately not (so far, at least). I happen to be very busy in real life so I never had the chance to think about an exhibition and organize it.

Timos6

Tell us about a great pinhole photographer.

Zeb Andrews is a photographer who’s work I enjoy a lot.

Do you shoot other styles of photography?

Yes, mostly street photography and landscapes.

Timos7

Assuming you do shoot other styles, do you prefer pinhole and if so, why?

I wouldn’t say that I prefer pinhole, I see it as something special, something different from my main shooting style, that gives me an opportunity to express myself in an alternative way.

You shoot digital pinhole images rather than film or paper, did you make that decision because of convenience or for another reason?

Actually it is a matter of conveniance for me, because shooting on film would mean to carry another camera with me. I try to eliminate as much as possible the gear I carry with me (this is one of the reasons I use m4/3 cameras) so in this time of my life I prefer using one additional small lens instead of another camera and some rolls of film (let alone a tripod), in order to shoot pinhole images. Admin’s note, I travel a lot as well and that’s a constant battle for me as well. I always end up taking all the cameras :-).

Timos9

What advantages and disadvantages do you think there are shooting digitally?

As i mentioned above, the main advantage is that no additional gear is needed. There is also the usual advantage of digital photography that the result is immediatly shown and no additional cost is needed to purchase film rolls, develop and scan them. Finally, the specific lens I use for my photos, the “Wanderlust pinwide”, is very wide, equivalent to 22mm on 35mm camera, which I like because I mostly shoot landscapes when I am in “Pinhole mode”. One final advantage is the ability to shoot in “Normal” shooting speeds, without the need of a tripod, because digital gives the opportunity of high ISO and stabilization. Admin’s note, I think this is a really interesting insight into the choices Timos has made. It makes perfect sense to me, and its great to hear this articulated so well.

The disadvantages are that with film one can always work with the large format film, from 35mm to larger, which gives a very special pinhole look and  all the relative benefits of depth of field and resolution.

Timos11

Finally, where can people see your work, do you have a website?

Unfortunately I don’t have a website of my own but my work can be seen in my Flickr photostream.

Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your work with pinholista.com. 

Thank you too for giving me the opportunity to present my work.

So, I hope you all enjoyed this interview as much as I did. Its great to have someone who regularly shoots digital on here. I guess next I need to find someone who uses paper. As per usual, please respect Timos’ copyright. All images are copyright Timos Lytras and should not be used in any form without prior permission.

Timos13

Márcio Faustino

Hi Pinholista, please introduce yourself.

My name is Márcio Faustino, I was born in Sao Paulo (Brazil) and I was living near Freiburg in Germany (but have recently moved to near Hamburg). Before I used to live in Dublin where I actually start take photographs more seriously.

Tell us a little about the type of pinhole photography you enjoy.

Large and panoramic medium format are the ones I like the best, mostly because I prefer make contact prints and conserve the original size from the negative. Most of the time black and white but some times I experiment with colours. Medium format panoramic and 4×5 large format have about the size of postcards which I think is charming. Admin’s note, I completely agree about the joy of making contact prints from a large negative, if only I had the time to do that.

Do you ever shoot anything a little more unusual? 

Not really. The most unusual I shoot is panoramic 6×17 medium format which is not that unusual.

Dreaming Tree, 2015 by Marcio Faustino

Do you use off the shelf cameras, home-made or a mix?

My first five pinhole cameras I made myself. They where between 3×4 and 15×15 large format. But it was when I was still learning about pinholes. I don’t use them today anymore.

When I decided to focus on pinhole photography I bought the cameras, specially because I trust more manufactures pins and quality than my home made cameras. Admin’s note, I have to say the idea of a 15×15 large format camera fills me with a special kind of joy!

What’s your favourite camera to use and why?

It is the one called “Reality so Subtle 141” a ultra wide medium format panoramic 6×17 camera with back curved plane to avoid vignetting. I just love the camera.

How long have you shot pinhole?

I first started in the spring/summer of 2013 but it was more about building cameras than actually taking pictures. The photographs I made from that period was just test shots. After a long break I am almost only photographing with pinhole since December 2014.

Winter in Titisee, 2015 by Marcio Faustino

Why did you start shooting pinhole and why?

The reason is its simplicity and “rustic” look.

I use to walk a lot in the forest, cities and mountains because I like exploring places. With me I had always one or sometimes two heavy cameras and lenses. Until the day I realised I could instead carry pinhole cameras. They are so light that I feel my bag as if it was empty. I don’t have to worry about lenses, batteries, rain and snow, impacts and many other small things. I also can take large format photographs with a pinhole camera that is the same size of my smaller format lensed cameras. And pinhole photography costs are very attractive.

A part from the tool itself, before I started with pinhole I have being following the path to a more rustic look in my photographs. This is the reason I was shooting 99% with film negatives using old cameras before.

Technology is great but in many ways it is also a distraction in my opinion. Pinhole is photography at its purest form. Admin’s note, what great reasons for shooting pinhole. I have a lovely 4×5 large format pinhole (see here [link to RSS]) that is a nice light camera to walk around with and yet which delivers massive negatives. 

You’ve given us a few images to share, tell us about them. 

Hunger with fruits, 2014, was one of the first photographs I took just after start using pinhole camera as my official tool.

It was photographed in a raining day. Instead of waiting for a clear sky day to go out, I thought it was a good idea experiment with bulb light. Using a 150w bulb and a white umbrella light diffuser I had to place the light very near and pull the ISO from Delta 100 up to 200, because I didn’t want to wait for a exposure of +4h and I had only Delta 100 in the moment. The result was a very contrasty negative image.

Despite the work I had made to make the print look better I am happy with this photograph because of the shapes lines, contrast and composition

I bought some contrast filters because of this print, but I didn’t print it again using filters. I just moved forwards.

Dreaming Tree, 2014, was shot a few minutes from home. Every day I take the train to work I see this field with some trees, and every day I told myself that I should one day bring my camera to take a photograph there.

So in a beautiful day I went there and while preparing everything for the photograph a boy walking his dog came to observe what I was doing. After a while he asked “why are you photographing this tree and not that one?” pointing to a tree just besides the one I was shooting.

I thought it was a strange question but I got what he meant and answered “This three has more shapes which looks attracting and interesting to my eyes. The one beside has more straight lines, meaning less shapes, looking less interesting and dull.

The boy walked away maybe thinking it was a strange answer. Admin’s note, what a great story, I like the fact that the boy made Marcio think about what he was photographing. I’ve also found people love pinhole cameras, and I guess that was shown again here.

Titisee Winter, 2014, was shot in a town in the Black Forest called Titisee.

I was very curious and excited to see if and how I could photograph scenes with snow. And it was snowing very light during the exposure but since it is a pinhole camera I was glad I didn’t have to worry about it getting wet. And since it was about 7min exposure time the scene appears very clean, without snow flakes flying around.

I just kept one eye on the orange filter hanging in front of the pin in case of snow landing on it, which didn’t happen.

I like the mix of large format sharpness and pinhole soft focus which handle very well in this image in my opinion. This three images was made with Ilford Obscura, a one shot camera but it does the job very well.

One month after shooting with Ilford Obscura I got a Reality So Subtle 141. I was very excited to photograph ultra wide panoramic.

Freiburg Cathedral, 2015 by Marcio Faustino

Freiburg Cathedral, 2015, was a 3 long hours of exposure in a cold building. To warm myself I had to walk around sometimes, but always keeping my eyes on the camera just in case. Since it was a very long exposure time I didn’t have to worry about all the tourists passing by.

The good thing about pinhole cameras is that I can set it behind something for an exposure and it won’t catch much attention depending on its size and shape. To make sure nobody would trip on my camera, I installed it on a tripod on a low level, so people could see and avoid stepping on the camera, but in a low level to don’t occupy much space avoiding attracting the building administrators attention or annoying tourists.

About the same I took the Freiburg Strassbahn, 2015. Because of the smaller space the camera and the tripod attracted much more attention. I went to the last stop and installed my camera there, in the end of the last wagon, just to avoid unhappy conductor complaints.

People coming in through the door seemed very surprised and  a bit worried about what the saw at the first moment, but only one person said something. This person actually screamed “ehaaa what is it???”. After telling that it was my camera he just said “ok” and ignored it afterwards.

Could be that people was so worried they where even afraid to say something… I don’t know. Admin’s note, sadly I think many of us have encountered folks unhappy with seeing a camera. In the UK people seem to hate being photographed, but I tend to find if you talk to them, and explain what you are shooting and why they tend to be OK…just as Marcio found.

Freiburg Rathausplatz, 2015, is where usually tourists and locals go to enjoy the good weather days on weekends. This was the first photograph I had in mind to actually mix people standing still and moving people, which add an special effect or feeling to the scene. The warm colours is also what I appreciate on film photographs, the reason I always prefer Kodak Portra even for landscapes, architecture and nature.

But its very seldom I do colour photography. I like the dreaming aspect of the black and white images and I work better with them in the darkroom.

Freiburg strassbahn, 2015 by Marcio Faustino

Do you shoot individual images or do you work within themes or on projects?

I have many themes that I shoot very often and again with my lensed cameras. Pinhole is new for me and I am still exploring its possibilities. At the moment I am only photographing landscape, cityscapes and seldom still, but as soon as I recover my financial stability (if I do) I want experiment with street portraits, continuous my ‘legs and feet’ photographs theme, ‘Bad Weather’, all shot in the streets using random people I find on the way.

But I probably will have to get a 6×6 pinhole camera to be able to experiment with theses themes.

Have you ever exhibited your work?

I had 3 formal exhibition in 3 countries (New Zealand, Ireland and Germany). But none of them were with my pinhole photographs but before I started with pinhole photography.

Exhibition is not something I am into because since I am often broke and so I always have trouble framing my photographs for the show; especially here in South Germany where the prices are way too high (and far from realistic). I just can’t afford it.

Tell us about a great pinhole photographer.

Aberlado Morell use interior rooms as a big pinhole camera. He cover the window leaving only the hole to let the image out side window project on the interior walls. I think this project from him is great.

To be honest (I hope it doesn’t sound arrogant), I don’t follow other photographers work. I can tell names and I remember a couple of images from them, I sure enjoy look at others work when I see them in the internet as well as I would love to live in a more busy city with galleries and museums exhibiting photographs, especially pinhole photographs. But I am too distracted and my memory is too short to keep my mind on others activities. I can only focus on what I can do and on survive so I can continuos doing what I enjoy doing. Admin’s note, this doesn’t seem arrogant at all. In fact I think it is really refreshing. I often think that you can shoot more for yourself and make the images you want without interference in your own process if you don’t think too much about the images others make. All that being said, i do love the community of pinhole photographers (and have made some great friends through it) . 

For this reason I can’t tell much about Morell and any other pinhole photographer. I could google them but I prefer to confess than pretend.

Freiburg Rathausplatz, 2015 by Marcio Faustino

Do you shoot other styles of photography?

I do lensed analog photography and very seldom digital photography too.

Assuming you do shoot other styles, do you prefer pinhole and if so, why?

I prefer pinhole because I prefer to work on the simplest way as possible. I also enjoy the workflow the better. Even for events like wedding and photographing models for nude and fashion, I am always thinking on how I could do with pinhole cameras, wishing to be able to experiment some day soon.

Finally, where can people see your work, do you have a website?

Yes, my pinhole photographs can be seeing at:

http://www.marciofaustino.com/pinhole.html

Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your work with pinholista.com.

Thank you. :)

All photographs are copyright Marcio Faustino and must not be used without prior permission. I know you know this, please respect it.